Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Needful Things: Pulp Novels for Your Refrigerator

If you've got any pulp fans whose stockings need stuffing, or if the front of your fridge is decorated solely with the free magnets from your local pizza joints, get your wallet ready. These retro-cool magnets sold by Auntie B's Wax are well worth the five bucks.

I Wake Up Screaming, and then I head to the fridge.


The 3 1/2" magnets are custom-made, so you'll have to nab your favorites fast. Many of the designs  are listed as "only one available." There are plenty of cover art reproductions with a high sleaze factor, like Sin on Wheels, Quickie, and Teacher's Pet ( "Judy stayed after class for special tutoring ... and earned her diploma the easy way!")

Some of the cover art magnets from Auntie B's Wax.



Mystery fans will probably appreciate the fact that a few of the magnets, while bearing hilariously vintage cover art, represent some books with worthwhile content. Cornell Woolrich's I Married a Dead Man (written as William Irish) is an excellent read, despite the goofy ghoul on this particular edition.

From book, to film, to refrigerator magnet.


Check out the full collection at the shop.






11 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for featuring my magnets on your blog! I love pulp fiction cover art and I'm not above giving these magnets to people as subversive messages (like Office Tramp - a favorite!). I would love to read some of the books that wear the covers I use for my magnets. Do you have any sources to find them?

    Thanks again, and Happy Reading!

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    1. Ha! I'm sure your office tramp giftees are none the wiser.

      BookFinder is my favorite resource for old books, because it combs multiple sites simultaneously to find the best price. You should check out I Married a Dead Man, for sure. It's a good thriller, and doesn't actually feature a zombie corpse like the cover art suggests.

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  2. Great fun Kelly - but I'd love to have some of the original paperbacks too!

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  3. Thanks Kelly! I love this post and the magnets!

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  4. And, of course, paperbacks are not and were not pulps. As handsome/garish as the covers might be on both.

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    1. Thanks for the correction, Todd. I of course recognize the distinction, but I grew up hearing the term "pulp" used for this style of novel (and I still frequently see it), so it's a hard habit to shake. I don't know what to use instead. Pulp-STYLE? Dime novel?

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    2. Nope...dime novels were something else again, though akin to pulps and paperbacks (and leading up to them both). "Paperback" should be sufficient, from the days when they were disparaged (as I like to note, remember the Beatles' song?).

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    3. "Paperback" might suffice for those as in the know as you are, but for the masses, I don't know if it's enough. Maybe "vintage paperbacks" will do.

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